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Magnet® Recognition

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The Highest Honor for Nursing Excellence

Riverside Medical Center is the area's only Magnet® Recognized Hospital

Riverside Medical Center’s commitment to the highest quality of patient care has not gone unrecognized.  The American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet ® Recognition Program has unanimously voted to credential Riverside Medical Center as a Magnet® Credentialed Organization.  

The Magnet designation is one of the highest honors a hospital can earn with respect to the standard of nursing care provided. With this credential, Riverside joins the Magnet community—a select group of 378 healthcare organizations out of nearly 6,000 U.S. healthcare organizations.[i]

“Magnet recognition provides our community with the ultimate benchmark to measure the quality of patient care,” said Phil Kambic, Riverside Medical Center president and CEO. 


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Magnet recognition has become the gold standard for nursing excellence and is taken into consideration when the public judges healthcare organizations. In fact, U.S. News & World Report’s annual showcase of “America’s Best Hospitals” includes Magnet recognition in its ranking criteria for quality of inpatient care.

“Achieving Magnet recognition reinforces the culture of excellence that is a cornerstone of how we serve our community,” said David Duda, Senior Vice President of Operations and Chief Nursing Officer at Riverside Medical Center.  “It’s also tangible evidence of our nurses’ commitment to providing the very best care to our patients—and of this we are extremely proud.”

To achieve Magnet recognition, organizations must pass a rigorous and lengthy process that demands widespread participation from leadership and staff. The process begins with the submission of an electronic application, followed by written documentation demonstrating qualitative and quantitative evidence regarding patient care and outcomes. If scores from the written documentation fall within a range of excellence, an on-site visit will occur to thoroughly assess the applicant. After this rigorous on-site review process, the Commission on Magnet will review the completed appraisal report and vote to determine whether Magnet recognition will be granted.

In particular, the Magnet model is designed to provide a framework for nursing practice, research, and measurement of outcomes. Through this framework, ANCC can assess applicants across a number of components and dimensions to gauge an organization’s nursing excellence. The foundation of this model is composed of various elements deemed essential to delivering superior patient care. These include the quality of nursing leadership and coordination and collaboration across specialties, as well as processes for measuring and improving the quality and delivery of care.

Magnet recognition has been shown to provide specific benefits to hospitals and their communities, such as

About the American Nurses Credentialing Center’s (ANCC) Magnet Recognition Program®

The Magnet Recognition Program® administered by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), the largest and most prominent nurses credentialing organization in the world, recognizes healthcare organizations that provide the very best in nursing care and professionalism in nursing practice. The Magnet Recognition Program® serves as the gold standard for nursing excellence and provides consumers with the ultimate benchmark for measuring quality of care. For more information about the Magnet Recognition Program® and current statistics, visit www.nursecredentialing.org/magnet.

[i] American Hospital Association. Fast Facts on US Hospitals. Retrieved from http://www.aha.org/aha/resource-center/Statistics-and-Studies/fast-facts.html

[ii] Kutney-Lee, A., McHugh, M. D., Sloane, D. M., Cimiotti, J. P., Flynn, L., Neff, D. F., Aiken, L. H. (2009). Nursing: A key to patient satisfaction. Health Affairs 28(4): 669-77.

[iii] Aiken, L. H., Clarke, S. P., Sloane, D. M., Lake, E. T., Cheney, T. (2008). Effects of hospital care environment on patient mortality and nurse outcomes. Journal of Nursing Administration 38(5): 223-229; Friese, C. R., Lake, E. T., Aiken, L. H., Silber, J. H., Sochalski, J. (2008). Hospital nurse practice environments and outcomes for surgical oncology patients. Health Services Research 43(4): 1145-1163.

[iv] Lacey, S. R., Cox, K. S., Lorfing, K. C., Teasley, S. L., Carroll, C. A., Sexton, K. (2007). Nursing support, workload, and intent to stay in Magnet, Magnet-aspiring, and non-Magnet hospitals. Journal of Nursing Administration 37(4): 199-205l; Schmalenberg, C., Kramer, M. (2008). Essentials of a productive nurse work environment. Nursing Research 57(1): 2-13; Ulrich, B. T., Buerhaus, P. I., Donelan, K., Norman, L., Dittus, R. (2007). Magnet status and registered nurse views of the work environment and nursing as a career. Journal of Nursing Administration 37(5): 212-220; Ulrich, B. T., Woods, D., Hart, K. A., Lavandero, R., Leggett, J., Taylor, D. (2007). Critical care nurses’ work environments: Value of excellence in Beacon units and Magnet organizations. Critical Care Nurse 27(3): 68-77.

[v] Ulrich, B. T., Buerhaus, P. I., Donelan, K., Norman, L., Dittus, R. (2007). Magnet status and registered nurse views of the work environment and nursing as a career. Journal of Nursing Administration 37(5): 212-220.